World Cup Book Bingo

The 2018 World Cup is coming to an end and to celebrate the countries in the quarter finals, we have created a World Cup Book Bingo. The books in the table above are translations of works from the eight countries – and in England’s case, two suggestions of titles by authors whose experiences might have been far from your own.

CCB’s Belgian title suggestion, The Misfortunates by Demitri Verhurlst, is a semi-autobiographical novel about the author’s ‘shambolic’ upbringing and a family not familiar with the terms sobriety and moderation.

From the other side of the Atlantic, Blood-Drenched Beard by David Galera is an ambitious and thoughtful novel about a man who makes many discoveries when he moves to a small quiet town on the Brazilian coast.

How to Tie your Shoes by Nikola Petkovi is a fascinating combination of private familial life and the turbulent history of post-Yugoslav transition. An interesting perspective on the links between individual and collective trauma.

Assuming many CCB customers are Devon-based, our English titles are from different parts of the UK to encourage readers to discover underrated regional writers. The Handsworth Times by Sharon Duggal, set in Thatcher’s Britain, is a story about a West Midlands family facing their own nightmares and a community that refuses to disappear. A story of loss, transition and pulling together.

Guy Gunaratne’s debut novel, In Our Mad and Furious City, is an incredible story about three friends growing up on Stones estate in London. When riots break out and people killed, the friends are caught up in the middle. Raw, challenging and a refreshing perspective on the trials and tribulations of a London upbringing.

From an estate in London to a global adventure, Around the World in Eighty Days sees eccentric Englishman Phileas Fogg wager his fortune and attempt to navigate the world in eighty days. This classic story is funny and remarkable and can be read many times over.

By a Ukrainian author and written in Russian, Death and the Penguin, is a dark tale about Victor, a journalist, and his flatmate, Misha, a Penguin. A strange and thoughtful novel belonging to the tradition of Russian satire.

Another dark story, The True Deceiver by Tove Jansson, is set in a Swedish hamlet in the deep winter. A portrayal of two women who come together in unusual circumstances and circle around each other with truth and lies. Who is deceiving who?

CCB’s Uruguayan suggestion, The Invisible Bridge/El Puente Invisible, is a bilingual collection of philosophical poems by the poet, essayist, translator and teacher, Circe Maia. Vivid images and masterful translations – Maia has an outstanding poetic vision.

Please get in touch and let us know what you think of these titles, or if you have any other suggestions for translated titles we should be shouting about!

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